Coworking Space Brings Back The Creativity Of The Italian Renaissance

 

600 years ago, the grand glory years of Italy’s Renaissance were in full bloom. There were many incredible strides in architecture, art, and engineering during the time period. The look of a classic 15th-century “bottega” (workshop) reveals just how innovative things were during the era.

The Harvard Business Review turns back time to give the reader an insight into what these workshops were like. In these hallowed spaces, artists were taught the skills of their trade. Many brilliant artists cultivated their talent in such places.

All manner of artists were welcome to hone their skills inside of these workshops. Painters, sculptors, and more were welcome. They studied under the tutelage of a wise master. The master was wise in the sense he did not impose any hard rules of sense of style on the students.

Within the loose confines of the workshop, three basic approaches to the learning process were employed. The learning endeavor mixed turning ideas into action, fostering dialogue, and facilitating the convergence of art and science. Clearly, the goal here was not to force the artists to create material without thought or aspiration. Doing so would not really lead to the creation of art.

The fusion between art and science was common in these learning circles. Interestingly, this commonly occurs today in many industries. The tech world, in particular, is home to many science-oriented artists. There are art-oriented scientists as well. Regardless of who is working and learning in a particular environment, the way the rules and culture of the environment factor into its productivity.

Workville of New York City (http://workvillenyc.com/) draws upon some of those classic concept from the “old days”. Workville is in the business of facilitating co-working space/shared office space in the busiest city in the world. Create wonderful work environments with this outstanding service and tap into the brilliance of those who inhabit the space. Workville just might be the way to bring back the Italian Renaissance and situate the era in the heart of NYC.